Graphene Oxide Biosensor Could Speed Up Research on Cancer and HIV Drugs

graphene oxide bio sensorLonging to find a cure for cancer, HIV and other yet incurable diseases, researchers have already tried out hundreds of drugs, each requiring preclinical and clinical testing with live subjects. How many chemical agents more to try? Moving at such rate, will we find the cure during our lifetime?

One of the easiest ways to speed up the drug development process is to simply perform it outside of the living body (e.g., by watching the substances react with the smallest pieces of live tissue and thus quickly predicting the overall effect it will mak
e to the body when inside).  This approach will eventually provide more effective preclinical selection of drug candidates for the subsequent long-term and expensive clinical trial. This could get the humanity closer to finding the cures we’ve long been seeking for.

Researchers from the Laboratory of Nanooptics and Plasmonics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology – MIPT (Russia) have devised a novel type of graphene oxide (GO) based biosensor that could potentially significantly speed up the process of drug development. The outstanding properties of this carbon allotrope help to improve significantly the biosensing sensitivity, which in future may enable the development of new drugs and vaccines against many dangerous diseases including HIV, hepatitis and cancer. The research, led by Yury Stebunov, a scientist at the MIPT, was published in the ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

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Graphene Oxide’s effectiveness as a nanomedicine.

Medicine is one of the highest achievements of the human species and graphene is about to play its part in the most recent and exciting developments in the discipline; that is in the emerging domain of nanomedicine.  Concerns for health and well-being have inspired some of the boldest innovations in history and nanomedicine continues in the great tradition of these pioneering advances. Born of interdisciplinary work in the fields of bioengineering, physics, chemistry and medicine, nanomedicine is increasingly looking to the material properties of graphene to assist in some of its most interesting projects.

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