PEN Inc. (OTCQB:PENC) Develops Graphene-Based Product for Use in Medical Imaging

PEN Inc. (OTCQB: PENC) (“PEN” or “the Company”), a global leader in enhanced performance products enabled by nanotechnology to solve everyday problems, today announced the launch of a new graphene-based product for use in the production of nuclear pharmaceuticals used as diagnostic imaging biomarkers. Patients are given these pharmaceuticals when undergoing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which is a molecular imaging system that provides clinicians detailed information about diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders and cardiovascular disease.

The new product is a thin carbon foil made of layers of graphene for use in cyclotron accelerators that produce nuclear pharmaceuticals. Developed at the Company’s Applied Nanotech Inc. subsidiary in Austin, Texas, the new graphene foils were part of a DOE Phase II SBIR effort to develop carbon foils for next generation ion beam accelerators. The graphene foils can serve as either stripper foils or extraction foils, both of which are integral to the operation of ion beam accelerators.

“Our new graphene foils are a perfect example of how Applied Nanotech is leveraging research supporting U.S. government priorities into new business opportunities,” said Dr. Scott Rickert, CEO of PEN Inc. Dr. Richard Fink, President of Applied Nanotech noted: “Our team has over 15 years of experience and know-how in the field, including our US Patent No. 6,819,034 that describes the application of graphene in the form of carbon flakes.”

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Graphene Oxide Biosensor Could Speed Up Research on Cancer and HIV Drugs

graphene oxide bio sensorLonging to find a cure for cancer, HIV and other yet incurable diseases, researchers have already tried out hundreds of drugs, each requiring preclinical and clinical testing with live subjects. How many chemical agents more to try? Moving at such rate, will we find the cure during our lifetime?

One of the easiest ways to speed up the drug development process is to simply perform it outside of the living body (e.g., by watching the substances react with the smallest pieces of live tissue and thus quickly predicting the overall effect it will mak
e to the body when inside).  This approach will eventually provide more effective preclinical selection of drug candidates for the subsequent long-term and expensive clinical trial. This could get the humanity closer to finding the cures we’ve long been seeking for.

Researchers from the Laboratory of Nanooptics and Plasmonics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology – MIPT (Russia) have devised a novel type of graphene oxide (GO) based biosensor that could potentially significantly speed up the process of drug development. The outstanding properties of this carbon allotrope help to improve significantly the biosensing sensitivity, which in future may enable the development of new drugs and vaccines against many dangerous diseases including HIV, hepatitis and cancer. The research, led by Yury Stebunov, a scientist at the MIPT, was published in the ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

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