Which Graphene Companies to Invest in?

The graphene industry is full of buzz. There are new graphene developments every month. Whether it is new findings from an Ivy League research lab or a graphene company issuing its initial public offering. It is all very exciting. But it is also all very confusing. So how do you know which graphene stocks you should buy? Here are some tips for investing in graphene:

  1. Has the company found its niche?

It is important to find a graphene company that has decided what direction it wants to go. Does the company have focus? It can be difficult for a company to “be everything to everyone.” Generally good companies develop a strategy which is clear on what product, niche, geography, and value proposition they plan to focus on. Is the graphene company you are interested planning mass graphene production, mobile phone applications or patent licensing?

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Graphene – A slippery little thing.

graphene slipperiness

In manufacturing self-lubricating components for the tool and die industry, the SelfLube Company uses graphite and graphene in their everyday business. Graphite, which has been used since ancient times, was always thought to be pretty well understood –  but the reality is it has always been a strange substance. It is one of the few materials that doesn’t expand when heated or shrink when cooled (i.e., it has zero coefficient of linear expansion). It isn’t a metal, but it conducts electricity like a metal. And, when reduced to a single layer, Graphene, the name given to a single sheet of graphite, turns out to be the strongest material known – 100 times stronger than steel. It is not just a good conductor of electricity; it is the best-known conductor of electricity. And, it is slippery, very slippery.

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Graphite prices set to increase.

An attempt to preserve China’s position in the graphite marketplace by restricting supplies may cause a welcome increase in the share price of companies around the globe. With a market share of nearly 80% China is hoping to retain as much of its supply as possible, aiming in the long run to gain a stronger position as graphene and graphite based products become more commonplace. 

The Chinese curtailment of its supply will inevitably cause smaller mining companies and suppliers to flourish in the short term. One such company Archer Exploration (ASX:AXE), an Australian mining firm, anticipate a rise in the price of the raw material.

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Vorbeck Materials secures investment.

Vorbeck materials has secured investments totalling $10 million in the latest round of a fully subscribed series three funding, proving that the company’s innovations in the graphene marketplace continue to impress. Three investors, Black Powder, LLC and Fairbridge Venture Partners, LP proved dominant in the latest approach for funds, which included 15 additional investors.

The investments will enable Vorbeck to continue its work on new materials technology and should hopefully lead to the development of some inspired design ideas. The company is currently a leader in the manufacture of single sheet graphene and the first company in the world with graphene-based products in the market. As such Vorbeck can be said to be not only the market leader but the whole graphene product market entire. With the additional distinction of being the only company to have received EPA approval for the commercial production and sale of graphene-based products it will be some time before those companies that are following Vorbeck’s lead ever catch up.

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IBM unveil latest graphene transistor research

IBM (NYSE: IBM) scientists today unveiled several exploratory research breakthroughs that could lead to major advancements in delivering dramatically smaller, faster and more powerful computer chips.

For more than 50 years, computer processors have increased in power and shrunk in size at a tremendous rate. However, today’s chip designers are hitting physical limitations with Moore’s Law, halting the pace of product innovation from scaling alone. With virtually all electronic equipment today built on complementary-symmetry metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) technology, there is an urgent need for new materials and circuit architecture designs compatible with this engineering process as the technology industry nears physical scalability limits of the silicon transistor.

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