New graphene based inks for high-speed manufacturing of printed electronics

A low-cost, high-speed method for printing graphene inks using a conventional roll-to-roll printing process, like that used to print newspapers and crisp packets, could open up a wide range of practical applications, including inexpensive printed electronics, intelligent packaging and disposable sensors.

Developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge in collaboration with Cambridge-based technology company Novalia, the method allows graphene and other electrically conducting materials to be added to conventional water-based inks and printed using typical commercial equipment, the first time that graphene has been used for printing on a large-scale commercial printing press at high speed.

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New Graphene Oxide Enhanced “Fabric That Can Detect Noxious Gases

Researchers from the Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute and Konkuk University in the Republic of Korea have developed graphene enhanced fabrics that are able to detect lethal gases present in the air. The e-fabric alerts the wearer of danger by using an LED indicator. Cotton and polyester yarn is coated with a “nanoglue” known as bovine serum albumin (BSA). The fabric is then wrapped in a layer of graphene oxide sheets.

Graphene is an incredibly strong one-atom-thick layer of carbon, and is known for its excellent conductive properties of heat and electricity. The graphene oxide sheets adhered easily to the nanoglue. Testing showed that the fabrics were able to retain their electrical conducting properties even after a thousand consecutive bending, straightening and washing cycles. Finally, the graphene oxide strands were subjected to a chemical reduction process, which involves the gaining of electrons.

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Big Range of Behaviors For Tiny Graphene Pores

Like biological channels, graphene pores are selective for certain types of ions.

Author: Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office

The surface of a single cell contains hundreds of tiny pores, or ion channels, each of which is a portal for specific ions. Ion channels are typically about 1 nanometer wide; by maintaining the right balance of ions, they keep cells healthy and stable. Now researchers at MIT have created tiny pores in single sheets of graphene that have an array of preferences and characteristics similar to those of ion channels in living cells. Each graphene pore is less than 2 nanometers wide, making them among the smallest pores through which scientists have ever studied ion flow. Each is also uniquely selective, preferring to transport certain ions over others through the graphene layer.

“What we see is that there is a lot of diversity in the transport properties of these pores, which means there is a lot of potential to tailor these pores to different applications or selectivities,” says Rohit Karnik, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at MIT.

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Graphene Oxide Biosensor Could Speed Up Research on Cancer and HIV Drugs

graphene oxide bio sensorLonging to find a cure for cancer, HIV and other yet incurable diseases, researchers have already tried out hundreds of drugs, each requiring preclinical and clinical testing with live subjects. How many chemical agents more to try? Moving at such rate, will we find the cure during our lifetime?

One of the easiest ways to speed up the drug development process is to simply perform it outside of the living body (e.g., by watching the substances react with the smallest pieces of live tissue and thus quickly predicting the overall effect it will mak
e to the body when inside).  This approach will eventually provide more effective preclinical selection of drug candidates for the subsequent long-term and expensive clinical trial. This could get the humanity closer to finding the cures we’ve long been seeking for.

Researchers from the Laboratory of Nanooptics and Plasmonics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology – MIPT (Russia) have devised a novel type of graphene oxide (GO) based biosensor that could potentially significantly speed up the process of drug development. The outstanding properties of this carbon allotrope help to improve significantly the biosensing sensitivity, which in future may enable the development of new drugs and vaccines against many dangerous diseases including HIV, hepatitis and cancer. The research, led by Yury Stebunov, a scientist at the MIPT, was published in the ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

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Graphene 3D Lab (TSX-V:GGG) Files Full Patent on Graphene Manufacturing Process

Graphene 3D Lab Inc. (TSX-V: GGG, OTCQB: GPHBF) (“Graphene 3D”) is pleased to announce the filing of a non-provisional patent pertaining to the preparation and separation of atomic layers of graphene. This technological breakthrough represents a new, energy efficient process to manufacture, sort and classify graphene nanoparticles resulting in the potential for large scale production of high grade graphene. This patent relates to graphene nanoplatelets (GNP). Specifically the patent covers a new, energy efficient, non chemically invasive, process that significantly lowers the cost of preparing and separating high quality, low atomic layers of GNP. The application claims priority to provisional application No. 62/058,313, filed on Oct. 1, 2014 by Graphene Laboratories and will be assigned to Graphene 3D as part of the merger announced on August 12, 2015.

“The business implications associated with this filing are significant and near term. The extraordinary qualities of graphene has positioned it as one of the most sought after materials in research and development since its discovery in 2004,” said Elena Polyakova, Co-Chief Executive Officer. “However up to now, the high-cost of quality material has generally restricted its use to R&D labs. We are changing that and look forward to offering these benefits to our client base and to others who will now utilize graphene into mainstream manufacturing”.

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