Arkansas Scientists Control Graphene With Strain

Left, an atomic force microscope image of the suspended graphene membrane on the copper mesh. On the right, a scanning tunneling microscope image with atomic resolution taken on the suspended graphene membrane. The researchers were able to use the scanning tunneling microscope to control the shape, and therefore the electronic properties, of the graphene membrane. Courtesy image.

Graphene could be the superhero of materials – it’s light, strong and conducts heat and electricity effectively, which makes it a great material for potential use in all kinds of electronics. And because it’s made from carbon atoms, graphene is cheap and plentiful. Its electric and mechanical properties also affect one another in unique ways. But before freestanding graphene can live up to its potential, scientists need to be able to control these properties.

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Graphene Computer Chip Another Step Closer.

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University of Arizona physicists are making discoveries that may advance electronic circuit technology and bring the graphene computer chip a step closer to being a reality.

The tricky part physicists have yet to figure out how to control the flow of electrons through the material, a necessary prerequisite for putting it to work in any type of electronic circuit. Graphene behaves very different than silicon, the material currently used in semiconductors.

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Mass Produced Graphene Sheets From Dry Ice.

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Mixing a little dry ice and a simple industrial process cheaply mass-produces high-quality graphene nanosheets, researchers in South Korea and Case Western Reserve University report.
Graphene, which is made from graphite, the same stuff as “lead” in pencils, has been hailed as the most important synthetic material in a century. Sheets conduct electricity better than copper, heat better than any material known, are harder than diamonds yet stretch.

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New Graphene Production Method Uses Bacteria From Fluvial Sediment.

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The latest and possibly greenest of graphene production methods has emerged from work conducted at Toyohashi University in Japan. Research conducted by a team lead by Yuji Tanizawa has shown that microorganisms can be usefully employed to reduce grahene oxide flakes by means of respiration and electron transport. The new method vastly improves the current hydrazine vapour and high temperature techniques which are toxic and uneconomical.

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Piezoelectric Graphene Is A Nanoscale Shape Shifter

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By depositing atoms on one side of a grid of graphene, two materials engineers, Evan Reed and Mitchell Ong from the Stanford School of Engineering researchers at Stanford, have produced piezoelectricity in graphene for the first time. It is the first case of a nanoscale engineering of the effect and could eventually yield a dramatic degree of control in nanotechnology.

For those that haven’t been paying attention, graphene is a wonder material

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