Light Speed Computing With Graphene


Every second, your com­puter must process bil­lions of com­pu­ta­tional steps to pro­duce even the sim­plest out­puts. Imagine if every one of those steps could be made just a tiny bit more effi­cient. “It would save pre­cious nanosec­onds,” explained North­eastern Uni­v. assis­tant pro­fessor of physics Swastik Kar.

Kar and his col­league Yung Joon Jung, an asso­ciate pro­fessor in the Depart­ment of Mechan­ical and Indus­trial Engi­neering, have devel­oped a series of novel devices that do just that. Their work was pub­lished Sunday in the journal Nature Pho­tonics.

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New Graphene Based Drug Delivery System Promises Improvements in Healthcare.

Researchers at University of Pittsburgh have discovered a new medicinal drug delivery system that precisely targets the bodily area affected. The system, based on graphene oxide, is triggered by an electrical charge and has been shown to release an anti-inflammatory drug on demand.

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Graphene Water Balloon Could Provide New Insights Into Illness At The Molecular Level

A graphene water balloon may soon open up new vistas for scientists seeking to understand health and disease at the most fundamental level.

Electron microscopes already provide amazingly clear images of samples just a few nanometers across. But if you want a good look at living tissue, look again.

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Graphene Edges Slice Cell Membranes – Is The Toxicity Of Nanomaterials A Cause For Concern?


A collaboration of biologists, engineers, and material scientists at Brown University has found that jagged edges of graphene can easily pierce cell membranes, allowing graphene to enter the cell and disrupt normal function. Understanding the mechanical forces of nanotoxicity should help engineers design safer materials at the nanoscale.

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Graphene May Play Part In Antibacterial Healthcare


The latest research published by the RSC points to the potential for graphene to be used in wound care. Detailing the mechanism by which graphene slices through the membranes of bacteria and absorbs their phospholipids, the research throws extra light on a potential use that has been often cited. Graphene band-aids may well become a means of fighting infection, showing graphene to be a versatile material with multiple applications.

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