Graphene 3D Lab to Introduce Advance Materials for Flexible Graphene Light Sources at American Physical Society

(“Graphene 3D”) and Graphene Laboratories Inc (TSX-V: GGG, OTCQB: GPHBF) (“Graphene 3D” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that it will be exhibiting at the American Physical Society March Meeting, where it will feature its recently developed cutting edge products including graphene-based flexible organic Light Emitting Device (LED). These innovative materials are an excellent foundation for the creation of 2D and 3D printable electronics, wearable and other advance devices

The American Physical Society is one of the most highly regarded international forums; which is being attended by experts from industry, universities, and major R&D laboratories from all over the world to share groundbreaking scientific developments.

“The APS Meeting is always an excellent forum for us to meet with our current and prospective customers.” commented Elena Polyakova, Co-CEO of Graphene 3D. “We are especially excited to present our recent development, the graphene flexible light source. We are proud to be a part of the rapid effort towards commercialization of graphene based electronics and this recent advancement is an important step in this direction.”

The Company will exhibit in booth #503 (www.aps.org/meetings/march/exhibits/exhibitors.cfm). Trial sizes of the organic LED inks and substrates can be purchased on the Graphene-Supermarket at the following links: graphene-supermarket.com/OLED-Kit and graphene-supermarket.com/OLED-Anode-Kit. Graphene Supermarket is an e-commerce site operated by Graphene Laboratories, a subsidiary of Graphene 3D Labs. The company welcomes incoming requests for further collaboration and development in this area.

About Graphene 3D Lab Inc.
Graphene 3D Lab, Inc. is a world leader in the development, manufacturing and marketing of proprietary composites and coatings based on graphene and other advanced materials. These diverse materials have a wide spectrum of commercial, research and military applications. The Company’s wholly owned subsidiary, Graphene Laboratories Inc., currently offers over 100 graphene and related products to a client list comprised of more than 10,000 customers worldwide, including nearly every Fortune 500 tech company and major research university. Some notable clients are: NASA, Ford Motor Co., GE, Apple, Xerox, Samsung, Harvard University, IBM and Stanford University. The Company’s suite of products are available online at the company’s e-commerce platform Graphene Supermarket ( www.graphene-supermarket.com).

The 3D printing division of the Company offers a portfolio of specialty fused filament fabrication filaments.. These materials can be purchased through multiple distribution networks worldwide or directly online at www.blackmagic3D.com. Graphene 3D also holds a new proprietary technology encompassing the preparation and separation of atomic layers of graphene. This technological breakthrough represents a new, energy efficient process to manufacture, sort and classify graphene nanoparticles resulting in the potential for large scale production of high grade graphene at lower costs than exist in today’s marketplace.

The Graphene 3D facility is located in Calverton, NY and is equipped with material processing and analytical equipment. The company has six US patent applications pending for its technology.

Find more publicly traded graphene companies using our graphene company database.

 

Graphene 3D Lab Files Patent Application for Industry’s Most Advanced 3D Printer And Innovative, Graphene Based Organic LED Light Source

Graphene 3D Lab Files Patent Application for Industry’s Most Advanced 3D Printer And Innovative, Graphene Based Organic LED Light Source

Graphene 3D Lab Inc. (TSX-V: GGG, OTCQB: GPHBF) (“Graphene 3D”) is pleased to announce it has filed a provisional patent application relating to the process of 3D printing an organic LED light source with their innovative multi-functional 3D Printer. The printer patent relates to technology that will lead the global industry in multiple deposition techniques, robotic manipulator, laser and UV curing capabilities. The patent also covers a new 3D printer that can print a light source, an organic LED light that immediately functions when printed. The organic LED device structure utilizes a graphene coated transparent conductor window.

“We consider this new IP a dramatic leap forward, offering the ability to 3D print with multiple functional materials at the same time, including the ability to 3D print a working light. This printer was specifically designed to maximize the attributes of the functional materials we have already, and will introduce in the future to the market,” said Elena Polyakova Co-CEO of Graphene 3D. “Industrial builders will now have a printer with functionality that allows users to expand the potential of the projects they can design and manufacture. We believe these patents reflect the most advanced and functional 3D printer available anywhere today.”

“A primary mission of our company is to revolutionize 3D printing by making it capable of easily fabricating functional objects, things that work and can be used. Incredibly, we have developed the technology of 3D printing a light source ‘from scratch’, with one touch of a button,” added Daniel Stolyarov, Co-CEO of Graphene 3D. “Our main focus is developing specialized 3D printing techniques and materials that push past the boundaries of what is currently available.”

The printer will not be available immediately for pre-order. The company is currently evaluating contract manufacturing and partnership opportunities to support commercialization of the printer.

About Graphene 3D

Graphene 3D Lab is in the business of developing, manufacturing, and marketing proprietary graphene-based nanocomposite materials for various types of 3D printing, including fused filament fabrication. The Company is also involved in the design, manufacture, and marketing of 3D printers and related products for domestic and international customers.

The Graphene 3D Lab facility is located in Calverton, NY and is equipped with material processing and analytical equipment. The company has five US patent applications pending for its technology. For more information on Graphene 3D Lab, Inc., visit www.graphene3dlab.com.

For further details concerning Graphene 3D, please see the Company’s filing statement on SEDAR (www.sedar.com) under the Company’s profile.
Except for statements of historical fact, all statements in this press release, including, but not limited to, statements regarding future plans, objectives and payments are forward-looking statements that involve various risks and uncertainties.

Find more publicly traded graphene companies using our graphene company database.

Graphene Boosts Battery Performance

Graphene Boosts Battery Performance

Scientists have been trying for years to make a practical lithium-ion battery anode out of silicon, which could store 10 times more energy per charge than today’s commercial anodes and make high-performance batteries a lot smaller and lighter. But two major problems have stood in the way: Silicon particles swell, crack and shatter during battery charging, and they react with the battery electrolyte to form a coating that saps their performance.

Putting silicon ‘sawdust’ in a graphene cage boosts battery performance: Approach could remove major obstacles to increasing the capacity of lithium-ion batteries

Now, a team from Stanford University and the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has come up with a possible solution: Wrap each and every silicon anode particle in a custom-fit cage made of graphene, a pure form of carbon that is the thinnest and strongest material known and a great conductor of electricity.

In a report published in Nature Energy, they describe a simple, three-step method for building microscopic graphene cages of just the right size: roomy enough to let the silicon particle expand as the battery charges, yet tight enough to hold all the pieces together when the particle falls apart, so it can continue to function at high capacity. The strong, flexible cages also block destructive chemical reactions with the electrolyte.

“In testing, the graphene cages actually enhanced the electrical conductivity of the particles and provided high charge capacity, chemical stability and efficiency,” said Yi Cui, an associate professor at SLAC and Stanford who led the research. “The method can be applied to other electrode materials, too, making energy-dense, low-cost battery materials a realistic possibility.”

The Quest for Silicon Anodes

Lithium-ion batteries work by moving lithium ions back and forth through an electrolyte solution between two electrodes, the cathode and the anode. Charging the battery forces the ions into the anode; using the battery to do work moves the ions back to the cathode.

When it comes to making silicon anodes, scientists have been stymied by the fact that the silicon swells to three times its normal size during charging. For Cui and his collaborators, the quest first led to anodes made of silicon nanowires or nanoparticles, which are so small that they are much less likely to break apart. The team came up with a variety of ways to confine and protect silicon nanoparticles, from structures that resemble pomegranates to coatings made of self-healing polymers or conductive polymer hydrogels like those used in soft contact lenses. But these were only partly successful; the efficiency of the resulting anodes was still not high enough, and nanoparticles are expensive and hard to manufacture.

“This new method allows us to use much larger silicon particles that are one to three microns, or millionths of a meter, in diameter, which are cheap and widely available,” Cui said. “In fact, the particles we used are very similar to the waste created by milling silicon ingots to make semiconductor chips; they’re like bits of sawdust of all shapes and sizes. Particles this big have never performed well in battery anodes before, so this is a very exciting new achievement, and we think it offers a practical solution.”

It’s All in the Coating

For the graphene cages to work, they have to fit the silicon particles exactly. The scientists accomplished this in a series of steps: First they coated silicon particles with nickel, which can be applied in just the right thickness. Then they grew layers of graphene on top of the nickel; happily the nickel acts as a catalyst to promote graphene growth. Finally they etched the nickel away, leaving just enough space within the graphene cage for the silicon particle to expand.

“Researchers have tried a number of other coatings for silicon anodes, but they all reduced the anode’s efficiency,” said Stanford postdoctoral researcher Kai Yan, who carried out the experiments with graduate student Yuzhang Li. “The form-fitting graphene cages are the first coating that maintains high efficiency, and the reactions can be carried out at relatively low temperatures.”

Now the team will work on fine-tuning the process, Li added, and on producing caged silicon particles in large enough quantities to build commercial-scale batteries for testing.

Other researchers contributing to the study were Stanford’s Hyun-Wook Lee, Zhenda Lu and Nian Liu. The research was carried out by SIMES, the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences at SLAC, and funded by the Battery Materials Research program of the DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Office.

Find more publicly traded graphene companies using our graphene company database.

Graphene 3D Lab Announces R&D-Royalty Agreement with a Fortune 500 Manufacturer

(“Graphene 3D”) and Graphene Laboratories Inc. are pleased to announce they have signed a research, development and royalty agreement (“Agreement”) with a Fortune 500 listed manufacturer. Initially, the Agreement encompasses the development of multi-phased deliverables over the course of the next 12 months. For competitive reasons and pursuant to confidentially clauses contained with the Agreement, neither specific research objectives nor the identity of the Agreement partner can be publically disclosed. Upon successful completion of the research phase, and subject to approval by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, the developed materials will become a part of a consumer retail product.

The Agreement calls for all research and development costs and royalty obligations to be paid by the partner, as well as a first-right-of-refusal for supply of any graphene related materials in future manufacturing pertaining to Intellectual Property (IP) developed under the agreement. All IP developed under the scope of the Agreement will be jointly held by both parties. The partner has consecutively been included in the Fortune 500 list for over 15 years.

“Graphene is a complex and amazingly functional material with properties that provide unique advantages in a wide variety of manufacturing situations. We expect graphene to become a common ingredient in large-scale manufacturing, and the agreement announced today will likely be a common first-step for traditional manufactures,” said Elena Polyakova Co-CEO of Graphene 3D. “Manufacturers want the benefits of graphene, but it is a highly-specialized material. We are helping partners develop solutions and processes to incorporate graphene into their existing manufacture processes.”

“Our lab team will assist our partner to understand, handle and integrate graphene into future manufacturing,” added Daniel Stolyarov, Co-CEO of Graphene 3D. “We are not just replacing other additives with graphene, we are working jointly with our partners to elevate the potential of their products. Product expertise from our partners, graphene expertise from our lab – the results is new products that can do more than before.”

Research and development work will be completed by personnel from both Graphene 3D and Graphene Lab. Graphene 3D is in the late stages of acquiring Graphene Lab in an all-share, non-arms length transaction expected to close prior to the end of 2016, subject to approval from the TSX-V (See New Release dated: August 12, 2015). “Bringing Graphene Lab into Graphene 3D creates value for our existing shareholders by expanding the scope of commercial applications Graphene 3D can provide.” stated Stolyarov. “Combining these two entities give us much broader expertise to support existing manufactures.”

This news release is intended to fulfill all compliance, regulatory and TSX-V Exchange obligations relating to the disclosure of material news.

About Graphene 3D

Graphene 3D Lab is in the business of developing, manufacturing, and marketing proprietary graphene-based nanocomposite materials for various types of 3D printing, including fused filament fabrication. The Company is also involved in the design, manufacture, and marketing of 3D printers and related products for domestic and international customers.

The Graphene 3D Lab facility is located in Calverton, NY and is equipped with material processing and analytical equipment. The company has four US patent applications pending for its technology. For more information on Graphene 3D Lab, Inc., visit www.graphene3dlab.com.

About Graphene Laboratories

Graphene Laboratories Inc. (“GLI”) is incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and is controlled and managed by Daniel Stolyarov and Elena Polyakova, insiders of Graphene 3D. GLI., a leader in manufacturing and retailing of graphene and advanced materials owns the Graphene Supermarket(r), www.graphene-supermarket.com, a leading supplier of such products to customers around the globe. Graphene Laboratories client list is comprised of more than 8,000 customers worldwide, including nearly every Fortune 500 tech company and major research university. Some notable clients are: NASA, Ford Motor Co., GE, Apple, Xerox, Samsung, Harvard University, IBM and Stanford University. For the last fiscal year ending December, 2014, GLI recorded annual revenues of in excess of USD $1,000,000 and was cash flow positive. Moreover, GLI has no material debt, and only trade creditors.

According to prior announcement dated August 12, 2015, the Graphene 3D has entered in non-arm length share exchange agreement (the “SEA”) to acquire all issued and outstanding shares of Graphene Laboratories. The terms of the Share Exchange are subject to confirmation by a fairness opinion prepared by an independent business valuator, an audit of GLI’s financial statements, the approval of the independent directors of the Company, and the acceptance for filing by the TSX Venture Exchange. Prior completion of the transaction, the financial record of GLI does not appear in published filing statements of Graphene 3D.

For further details concerning the Transaction, please see the Company’s filing statement on SEDAR (www.sedar.com) under the Company’s profile.
Except for statements of historical fact, all statements in this press release, including, but not limited to, statements regarding future plans, objectives and payments are forward-looking statements that involve various risks and uncertainties.

For more information, please contact:

Commercial Inquiries:

Daniel Stolyarov
Co-Chief Executive Officer
Telephone: (631) 405-5116
Email: daniel.stolyarov@graphene3dlab.com

Investor Inquiries:

Investor Relations
Telephone (631) 405-5114
Email: investors@graphene3dlab.com

Graphene’s lightbulb moment

A graphene lightbulb with lower energy emissions, longer lifetime and lower manufacturing costs has been launched thanks to a University of Manchester research and innovation partnership.

Graphene Lighting PLC is a spin-out based on a strategic partnership with the National Graphene Institute (NGI) at The University of Manchester to create graphene applications.

The UK-registered company will produce the graphene lightbulb, which is expected to perform significantly better and last longer than traditional LED bulbs.

It is expected that the graphene lightbulbs will be on the shelves in a matter of months, at a competitive cost.

The University of Manchester has a stake in Graphene Lighting PLC to ensure that the University benefits from commercial applications coming out of the NGI.

The graphene lightbulb is believed to be the first commercial application of graphene to emerge from the UK, and is the first application from the £61m NGI, which only opened last week.

Graphene was isolated at The University of Manchester in 2004 by Sir Andre Geim and Sir Kostya Novoselov, earning them the Nobel prize for Physics in 2010. The University is the home of graphene, with more than 200 researchers and an unrivalled breadth of graphene and 2D material research projects.

The NGI will see academic and commercial partners working side by side on graphene applications of the future. It is funded by £38m from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and £23m from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF).

There are currently more than 35 companies partnering with the NGI. In 2017, the University will open the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC), which will accelerate the process of bringing products to market.

Professor Colin Bailey, Deputy President and Deputy Vice-Chancellor of The University of Manchester said: “This lightbulb shows that graphene products are becoming a reality, just a little more than a decade after it was first isolated – a very short time in scientific terms.

“This is just the start. Our partners are looking at a range of exciting applications, all of which started right here in Manchester. It is very exciting that the NGI has launched its first product despite barely opening its doors yet.”

James Baker, Graphene Business Director, added: “The graphene lightbulb is proof of how partnering with the NGI can deliver real-life products which could be used by millions of people.

“This shows how The University of Manchester is leading the way not only in world-class graphene research but in commercialisation as well.”