Graphene 3D Lab Announces R&D-Royalty Agreement with a Fortune 500 Manufacturer

(“Graphene 3D”) and Graphene Laboratories Inc. are pleased to announce they have signed a research, development and royalty agreement (“Agreement”) with a Fortune 500 listed manufacturer. Initially, the Agreement encompasses the development of multi-phased deliverables over the course of the next 12 months. For competitive reasons and pursuant to confidentially clauses contained with the Agreement, neither specific research objectives nor the identity of the Agreement partner can be publically disclosed. Upon successful completion of the research phase, and subject to approval by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration, the developed materials will become a part of a consumer retail product.

The Agreement calls for all research and development costs and royalty obligations to be paid by the partner, as well as a first-right-of-refusal for supply of any graphene related materials in future manufacturing pertaining to Intellectual Property (IP) developed under the agreement. All IP developed under the scope of the Agreement will be jointly held by both parties. The partner has consecutively been included in the Fortune 500 list for over 15 years.

“Graphene is a complex and amazingly functional material with properties that provide unique advantages in a wide variety of manufacturing situations. We expect graphene to become a common ingredient in large-scale manufacturing, and the agreement announced today will likely be a common first-step for traditional manufactures,” said Elena Polyakova Co-CEO of Graphene 3D. “Manufacturers want the benefits of graphene, but it is a highly-specialized material. We are helping partners develop solutions and processes to incorporate graphene into their existing manufacture processes.”

“Our lab team will assist our partner to understand, handle and integrate graphene into future manufacturing,” added Daniel Stolyarov, Co-CEO of Graphene 3D. “We are not just replacing other additives with graphene, we are working jointly with our partners to elevate the potential of their products. Product expertise from our partners, graphene expertise from our lab – the results is new products that can do more than before.”

Research and development work will be completed by personnel from both Graphene 3D and Graphene Lab. Graphene 3D is in the late stages of acquiring Graphene Lab in an all-share, non-arms length transaction expected to close prior to the end of 2016, subject to approval from the TSX-V (See New Release dated: August 12, 2015). “Bringing Graphene Lab into Graphene 3D creates value for our existing shareholders by expanding the scope of commercial applications Graphene 3D can provide.” stated Stolyarov. “Combining these two entities give us much broader expertise to support existing manufactures.”

This news release is intended to fulfill all compliance, regulatory and TSX-V Exchange obligations relating to the disclosure of material news.

About Graphene 3D

Graphene 3D Lab is in the business of developing, manufacturing, and marketing proprietary graphene-based nanocomposite materials for various types of 3D printing, including fused filament fabrication. The Company is also involved in the design, manufacture, and marketing of 3D printers and related products for domestic and international customers.

The Graphene 3D Lab facility is located in Calverton, NY and is equipped with material processing and analytical equipment. The company has four US patent applications pending for its technology. For more information on Graphene 3D Lab, Inc., visit www.graphene3dlab.com.

About Graphene Laboratories

Graphene Laboratories Inc. (“GLI”) is incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and is controlled and managed by Daniel Stolyarov and Elena Polyakova, insiders of Graphene 3D. GLI., a leader in manufacturing and retailing of graphene and advanced materials owns the Graphene Supermarket(r), www.graphene-supermarket.com, a leading supplier of such products to customers around the globe. Graphene Laboratories client list is comprised of more than 8,000 customers worldwide, including nearly every Fortune 500 tech company and major research university. Some notable clients are: NASA, Ford Motor Co., GE, Apple, Xerox, Samsung, Harvard University, IBM and Stanford University. For the last fiscal year ending December, 2014, GLI recorded annual revenues of in excess of USD $1,000,000 and was cash flow positive. Moreover, GLI has no material debt, and only trade creditors.

According to prior announcement dated August 12, 2015, the Graphene 3D has entered in non-arm length share exchange agreement (the “SEA”) to acquire all issued and outstanding shares of Graphene Laboratories. The terms of the Share Exchange are subject to confirmation by a fairness opinion prepared by an independent business valuator, an audit of GLI’s financial statements, the approval of the independent directors of the Company, and the acceptance for filing by the TSX Venture Exchange. Prior completion of the transaction, the financial record of GLI does not appear in published filing statements of Graphene 3D.

For further details concerning the Transaction, please see the Company’s filing statement on SEDAR (www.sedar.com) under the Company’s profile.
Except for statements of historical fact, all statements in this press release, including, but not limited to, statements regarding future plans, objectives and payments are forward-looking statements that involve various risks and uncertainties.

For more information, please contact:

Commercial Inquiries:

Daniel Stolyarov
Co-Chief Executive Officer
Telephone: (631) 405-5116
Email: daniel.stolyarov@graphene3dlab.com

Investor Inquiries:

Investor Relations
Telephone (631) 405-5114
Email: investors@graphene3dlab.com

Graphene’s lightbulb moment

A graphene lightbulb with lower energy emissions, longer lifetime and lower manufacturing costs has been launched thanks to a University of Manchester research and innovation partnership.

Graphene Lighting PLC is a spin-out based on a strategic partnership with the National Graphene Institute (NGI) at The University of Manchester to create graphene applications.

The UK-registered company will produce the graphene lightbulb, which is expected to perform significantly better and last longer than traditional LED bulbs.

It is expected that the graphene lightbulbs will be on the shelves in a matter of months, at a competitive cost.

The University of Manchester has a stake in Graphene Lighting PLC to ensure that the University benefits from commercial applications coming out of the NGI.

The graphene lightbulb is believed to be the first commercial application of graphene to emerge from the UK, and is the first application from the £61m NGI, which only opened last week.

Graphene was isolated at The University of Manchester in 2004 by Sir Andre Geim and Sir Kostya Novoselov, earning them the Nobel prize for Physics in 2010. The University is the home of graphene, with more than 200 researchers and an unrivalled breadth of graphene and 2D material research projects.

The NGI will see academic and commercial partners working side by side on graphene applications of the future. It is funded by £38m from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and £23m from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF).

There are currently more than 35 companies partnering with the NGI. In 2017, the University will open the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC), which will accelerate the process of bringing products to market.

Professor Colin Bailey, Deputy President and Deputy Vice-Chancellor of The University of Manchester said: “This lightbulb shows that graphene products are becoming a reality, just a little more than a decade after it was first isolated – a very short time in scientific terms.

“This is just the start. Our partners are looking at a range of exciting applications, all of which started right here in Manchester. It is very exciting that the NGI has launched its first product despite barely opening its doors yet.”

James Baker, Graphene Business Director, added: “The graphene lightbulb is proof of how partnering with the NGI can deliver real-life products which could be used by millions of people.

“This shows how The University of Manchester is leading the way not only in world-class graphene research but in commercialisation as well.”

Electromagnetic Properties of Graphene-Boron Nitride Materials

Houston, TX (Scicasts) — Developing novel materials from the atoms up goes faster when some of the trial and error is eliminated. A new Rice University and Montreal Polytechnic study aims to do that for graphene and boron nitride hybrids.

Rice materials scientist Rouzbeh Shahsavari and Farzaneh Shayeganfar, a postdoctoral researcher at Montreal Polytechnic, designed computer simulations that combine graphene, the atom-thick form of carbon, with either carbon or boron nitride nanotubes.

Their hope is that such hybrids can leverage the best aspects of their constituent materials. Defining the properties of various combinations would simplify development for manufacturers who want to use these exotic materials in next-generation electronics. The researchers found not only electronic but also magnetic properties that could be useful.

Their results appear in the journal Carbon.

Shahsavari’s lab studies materials to see how they can be made more efficient, functional and environmentally friendly. They include macroscale materials like cement and ceramics as well as nanoscale hybrids with unique properties.

“Whether it’s on the macro- or microscale, if we can know specifically what a hybrid will do before anyone goes to the trouble of fabricating it, we can save cost and time and perhaps enable new properties not possible with any of the constituents,” Shahsavari said.

His lab’s computer models simulate how the intrinsic energies of atoms influence each other as they bond into molecules. For the new work, the researchers modeled hybrid structures of graphene and carbon nanotubes and of graphene and boron nitride nanotubes.

“We wanted to investigate and compare the electronic and potentially magnetic properties of different junction configurations, including their stability, electronic band gaps and charge transfer,” he said. “Then we designed three different nanostructures with different junction geometry.”

Two were hybrids with graphene layers seamlessly joined to carbon nanotubes. The other was similar but, for the first time, they modeled a hybrid with boron nitride nanotubes. How the sheets and tubes merged determined the hybrid’s properties. They also built versions with nanotubes sandwiched between graphene layers.

Graphene is a perfect conductor when its atoms align as hexagonal rings, but the material becomes strained when it deforms to accommodate nanotubes in hybrids. The atoms balance their energies at these junctions by forming five-, seven- or eight-member rings. These all induce changes in the way electricity flows across the junctions, turning the hybrid material into a valuable semiconductor.

The researchers’ calculations allowed them to map out a number of effects. For example, it turned out the junctions of the hybrid system create pseudomagnetic fields.

“The pseudomagnetic field due to strain was reported earlier for graphene, but not these hybrid boron nitride and carbon nanostructures where strain is inherent to the system,” Shahsavari said. He noted the effect may be useful in spintronic and nano-transistor applications.

“The pseudomagnetic field causes charge carriers in the hybrid to circulate as if under the influence of an applied external magnetic field,” he said. “Thus, in view of the exceptional flexibility, strength and thermal conductivity of hybrid carbon and boron nitride systems, we propose the pseudomagnetic field may be a viable way to control the electronic structure of new materials.”

All the effects serve as a road map for nanoengineering applications, Shahsavari said.

“We’re laying the foundations for a range of tunable hybrid architectures, especially for boron nitride, which is as promising as graphene but much less explored,” he said. “Scientists have been studying all-carbon structures for years, but the development of boron nitride and other two-dimensional materials and their various combinations with each other gives us a rich set of possibilities for the design of materials with never-seen-before properties.”

Shahsavari is an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and of materials science and nanoengineering.

Graphene 3D Lab Inc. (TSXV:GGG) Introduces Graphene Flex Foam Product

Graphene 3D Lab Inc. (TSXV: GGG) (“Graphene 3D” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce the release of a new commercial product ‘Graphene Flex Foam’, a Multilayer Freestanding Flexible Graphene Foam. This material is a combination of highly conductive three-dimensional Chemical Vapor Disposition (“CVD”) ultra-light graphene foam and conductive elastomer composite.

“We have the ability to manufacture Graphene Flex Foam in basically any shape or size, but it is the flexibility of the product which we believe will capture the attention of innovative manufacturers who will want to evaluate the potential of commercializing this material into their products.” stated Elena Polyakova, Co-CEO of Graphene 3D. “Any company interested in a freestanding, stable, ultralight, highly conductive material that can flex with their product and fit into any space, will be interested in this innovation.”

This revolutionary product preserves all the remarkable properties of graphene foam such as superior electrical, with an added remarkable flexibility and ease of handling in an extremely lightweight and highly porous architecture.

“Graphene Flex Foam is an excellent substrate candidate in the manufacture of electrodes of lithium-ion batteries.” said Daniel Stolyarov, Co-CEO of Graphene 3D. “Wearable electronics is an obvious application as the electronics, sensors and conductive properties will all need to be flexible with the wearable material. “We also believe that this innovative product has a bright future for the next generation of flexible batteries and supercapacitors. Graphene Flex Foam offers energy storage as well as catalyst support in numerous organic synthesis reactions, gas sensors, flexible and ultrasonic acoustic device fabrication.”

The product will be available through Graphene Supermarket(r), an e-commerce site operated by Graphene Laboratories. Graphene 3D is currently acquiring Graphene Laboratories as a wholly-owned subsidiary (see new release dated August 24, 2015).

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Angstron Increasing Graphene Production From 300 to 1000 Tonnes

During remarks at GrapChina 2015 in Qingdao, China, Dr. Bor Jang, chief executive officer and co-founder of Angstron Materials Inc. (AMI) unveiled a two-pronged plan he says will raise production capacity and lower pricer, jump starting market growth.

“We are ramping up production of graphene from 300 metric tons a year to 1000 metric tons a year in 2016,” says Jang. “Inability to source commercial scale quantities of graphene has historically hampered the growth and implementation of graphene-enabled and graphene-enhanced applications such as next-generation energy technologies, composites, water treatment, and corrosion protection. Increased production means we can bring market costs down too, giving companies previously priced out of the graphene market access to the material’s unique performance advantages.”

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